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EEO/Employment-Related Bills


Number: HB1293
Title: Break Time for Expression of Breast Milk by Employees – Requirement - Unfavorable
This bill would require employers to provide an employee reasonable break time to express breast milk for a nursing child in a private place other than a bathroom for one year after the child’s birth. The employer would be required to pay the employee for the break time if the employer already compensates employees for break times or the employee is not relived from work duties while the employee is expressing breast milk. This law would not apply to employers employing fewer than 50 employees if compliance would impose an undue hardship.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Miele and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: HB1478 - No Movement on this bill
Title: Employment Discrimination – Sexual Harassment – Definition of Employer
Abstract:
This bill would amend the definition of employer under the Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act specifically as that definition relates to complaints of sexual harassment. For purposes of a complaint of sexual harassment, an employer would be defined as having one (1) or more employees (rather than 15 or more) for each working day in each of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Simonarie and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB401
Title: Equal Pay for Equal Work – Revisions - Unfavorable
Abstract:
This bill would amend the current Equal Pay for Equal Work law to allow the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (“DLLR”) to enter an employer’s premises to inspect and copy payroll and other records, to interview employees, and to obtain any other information necessary to enforce the Equal Pay for Equal work law.

The bill would also require the DLLR to have a hotline number that employees may use to file a complaint about a violation of the equal pay law.

The bill would also require the DLLR to establish an Equal Pay Commission to study pay disparities between men and women and between minorities and non-minorities in the public and private sectors.

The bill would further require employers to include the following information in a job advertisement: the minimum rate of pay (per hour, shift, week, piece, salary and/or commission); whether the employee is eligible for overtime, and whether a tip credit or meal or lodging allowance applies.

Employers would be prohibited from seeking or providing salary history information (wages and benefits) for an employee or applicant for employment without the employee’s or applicant’s written authorization.

The current law provides that an employee may bring a lawsuit against their employer for actual and liquidated damages; the bill seeks to add an additional equal amount as punitive damages and adds civil penalties (fines) for violations.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate K. Young and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: SB481
Title: Equal Pay for Equal Work - HB1003 Passed in the House and Senate; SB481 Passed in the Senate, and was re-referred to the Economic Matters Committee
Abstract:
This bill would amend the current Equal Pay for Equal Work statute to prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender or gender identity with respect to payment of wages and employment opportunities of employees who work in the same location of the employer.

Additionally, an employer may not prohibit an employee from inquiring about, discussing or disclosing their rate of pay or salary or that of another employee. Employers would also be prohibited from requiring an employee to sign a document that denies the employee the right to disclose or discuss their wages. Employers would be prohibited from retaliating against an employee for asking about another employee’s wages, disclosing his or her own wages, discussing another employee’s wages, asking the employer to explain why he or she is being paid a certain wage, or assisting other employees with accessing their rights under the proposed law. Employees would have the right to file a lawsuit against their employer seeking injunctive relief and for actual and liquidated damages (up to three times the amount of wages found to be due to the employee.)
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senator Lee and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB1004
Title: Equal Pay Commission-Establishment - PASSED in the House and Senate
Abstract:
The purpose of the Equal Pay Commission-Establishment bill is to establish the Equal Pay Commission in the Division of Labor and Industry. This bill provides the composition, chair and terms of certain members of the Commission.

The Commission would generally oversee (5) five areas;
1. Wage disparities in the public and private sectors in the State between individuals of protected groups (race, sex, or gender identity) based on all available data
2. Establish a mechanism for the Commission to collect data from employers in the State to assist the Commission in its efforts to evaluate disparities.
3. Develop a strategy to determine and recommend best practices regarding equal pay for equal work to individuals, employers, and policymakers
4. Develop partnerships with private sector entities and other public sectors to identify, methods of developing a data collection mechanism
5. Share data and findings with Commission to assist in enforcement actions.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Davis, Atterbeary, and others
If Passed, Effective: 06/01/2016

 

Number: SB664
Title: Fair Scheduling, Wage and Benefits Act - Unfavorable Report, WITHDRAWN
Abstract:
This bill would require an employer to provide employees with a certain work schedule within a specified time period. For new employees, an employer will need to provide to them in writing their schedule for 21 days. The 21 day work schedule will need to be provided to all employees before the first day an employee is scheduled to work. The work schedule is to be conspicuously posted at each work site and accessible to all employees. If the employer makes a change to employees work schedule, the employer shall pay the employee 1 hour of “predictability pay” for each shift that was changed. There are some exceptions identified for the predictability pay requirement. The employer will be responsible to pay the employee a specific number of hours if the employee showed up to their shift and the shift was either cancelled or hours were reduced with notification being given within 24 hours of the shift. There are various other posting requirements that an employer will need to follow regarding changes to shifts and hours. This bill is also setting requirements regarding employees pay. Stating that all employees doing the same work should be paid the same and offered the same promotion opportunities. Along with the posting and equal pay requirements, the employer must record specific employment information for each employee and retention standards of that information must be met. Finally, the bill outlines steps a person would take if to file a complaint with the commission and the amount of liquidated damages that would be allowed if the employer is found in violation. As written this law does not distinguish between exempt or non-exempt employees.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senator Benson
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: SB245 / HB 306
Title: Hiring and Promotion Preferences - Veterans and Spouses - SB245 Passed in the Senate and House; HB306 Passed in the House and passed in the Senate with amendments. The House asked the Senate to recede on its amendments, and the Senate refused.
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal and Policy Note Analysis, Click here.
This bill authorizes an employer to grant a hiring and promotion preference to an eligible veteran, the spouse of an eligible veteran who has a service-connected disability, or the surviving spouse of a deceased eligible veteran. An eligible veteran is a veteran of any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces who has received an honorable discharge or a certificate of satisfactory completion of military service, including the National Guard and the military reserves. The bill establishes that granting this preference does not violate any State or local Equal Employment Opportunity law.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senators Manno and Peters
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB1308
Title: Labor Organizations - UNFAVORABLE
Abstract:
Generally, this bill would prohibit certain employers from requiring, as a condition of employment or continued employment, an employee or a prospective employee to join or remain a member of a labor organization, pay charges to a labor organization, or pay a certain amount to a third party under certain circumstances.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate W. Miller and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016


Number: HB197
Title: Maryland Pay Stub Transparency Act - WITHDRAWN
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal Note and Policy Analysis, Click here.
This bill expands the wage records that an employer is required to keep for each pay period. Employers will be required to keep wage records for each pay period for at least 3 years. The bill likewise expands the wage and payday notices that an employer must provide to employees. The types of wage records that employers are required to keep for each pay period will be expanded. The Commissioner of Labor and Industry must create and make available a model notice that may be used by an employer to comply with specified wage notice requirements. Subsequently, employers will be required to give employees a specified written notice within 1 week after the first date of employment, which expands the information that employers are required to give to employees at the time of hiring and for each pay period, including an explanation of how wages were calculated; etc. The bill also allows for an employee or the Attorney General may bring an action against the employer under specified conditions to recover liquidated damages, counsel fees, and other costs. Upon written request of an employee, the Commissioner of Labor and Industry may take an assignment of the claim in trust for the employee, ask the Attorney General to bring an action on behalf of the employee, and consolidate two or more claims against an employer.
Status: In the House - Unfavorable Report by Economic Matters Committee; Withdrawn.
Sponsor: Delegate Lierman and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB249
Title: Members of Nat'l Guard and Maryland Defense Force - Employment and Reemployment Rights - Enforcement: HB249 Passed in the House and Senate; SB557 Passed in the Senate, but no movement in the House
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal and Policy Note Analysis, Click here.
This bill authorizes members of the Maryland National Guard and Maryland Defense Force (MDDF) whose employment and reemployment rights have been violated to bring a civil action for specified economic damages, damages including lost wages and benefits. The bill authorizes a court to award specified economic damages, reasonable counsel fees and other costs, and any other appropriate relief to members of the National Guard and Maryland Defense Force if the court determines that the member's employment and reemployment rights were violated.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Smith and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB 1440
Title: Labor and Employment- Noncompete and Conflict of Interest Clauses Passed in the House; no movement in the Senate
Abstract:
This bill would make any non-compete agreement entered into with employees earning equal or less than $15.00 per hour or $31,200 annually that restricts the ability of an employee to enter into employment with a new employer or become self-employed in the same business or trade null and void and considered as being against the public policy of the State.
Status: Pending (Hearing 3/7/2016)
Sponsor: Delegates Carr and Hornberger
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: SB948
Title: Nonpublic Elementary and Secondary Schools - Discrimination – Prohibition
- Withdrawn
Abstract:
While this bill would not require a school to enroll, retain or extend privileges to a student or prospective student who does not meet the usual and regular qualifications, requirements, and standards of the school, provided that denial is not based on a protected class, the bill would prohibit a nonpublic (aka private) elementary or secondary school that receives State funds from refusing to enroll, expelling, withholding privileges from, or otherwise discriminating against any student or prospective student because of specified factors.
The bill also makes specified provisions of law prohibiting discrimination in employment applicable to nonpublic elementary and secondary schools that receive State funds; makes specified remedies and procedures regarding discrimination applicable to specified discriminatory acts; etc. In other words, the bill would apply as above with respect to employment of individuals who are not ministerial employees.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senators Zucker and Madaleno
Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: HB950
Title: Labor and Employment-Number of Employees Granted H-1B or L-1 Visa – Disclosure - The bill did not move forward in the House
Abstract:
This bill would require each employer to make available to the public the number of the employer’s employees who have been granted an H-1B or L-1 visa by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and to disclose the number of employees granted H-1B or L-1 visas.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Fisher, S. Howard and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: HB1257
Title: Workplace Fraud Provisions – Repeal - Referred for interim study
Abstract:
Generally, this bill proposes to repeal the Workplace Fraud Act of 2009, which is a statute that governs classification of workers and requires employers in the landscaping and construction industries to provide certain notice to independent contractors.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Adams
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Leave and Benefits Related Bills

Number: HB740 / SB485
Title: Family and Medical Leave Insurance Program-Establishment: HB740 Passed in the House and Senate the bill is now in the Senate; SB485 passed in the Senate and House
Abstract:
This bill entitles eligible employees to receive temporary benefits (compensation) when they are taking partially paid or unpaid leave from employment for care of a newborn, to care for a family member with a serious health condition, for their own serious health condition, to care for a service member who is next of kin, or due to need arising out of the deployment of a family member. The benefit would be administered under the supervision of the Division of Unemployment Insurance and funded in part by employee contributions, which would begin, if the bill is passed, on January 1, 2017. The benefit amount paid to covered employees would be 66% of the highest total amount of wages earned by the employee in one week during a base period. There is also a provision to provide benefits to employees taking partially paid leave for these same reasons that amounts to an offset that brings their total benefit to the same level. The benefit amount must be greater than $50 and not more than $1000 per week for the 12-month period beginning July 1, 2018.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: HB740- Delegate Kelly and others; SB0485- Senator Pugh and others
If passed, effective: 06/01/2016

Number: HB580 / SB472
Title: Maryland Healthy Working Families Act - The House bill passed; the Senate has indicated it will not consider the bill this session.
Abstract:
Key provisions of the bill:
- Employers with more than 9 employees must provide paid sick and safe leave. Employers with 9 or fewer employees must provide employees with unpaid sick and safe leave. An employee who regularly works less than 8 hours a week is not eligible for sick and safe leave.
- Limit on accruing (or granting) leave: 1 hour for every 30 hours worked up to 56 hours per year. For purposes of leave calculation, exempt employees are presumed to work 40 hours each workweek.
- Carryover may be limited to 56 hours.
- Employer may limit use of leave to 80 hours per year.
- Employer may limit the total amount of accrued leave to 80 hours at any time.
- Employees may not be required to take leave in an increment of more than 4 hours.
- Employer may deny use of leave during first 90 days of employment or the first 480 hours works, whichever period is shorter.
- Accrual would begin October 1, 2016 or date of employment that is after October 1, 2016. Employers may grant leave at the beginning of each year rather than accruing leave throughout the year.
- No requirement to pay hours at termination.
- Employers would be required to reinstate hours upon rehire within 12 months of termination date.
- Use of leave: Employee’s or family member’s illness, preventative medical care for employee or family member; employer or school/child care closes due to public health emergency; absence from work due to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking against employee or family member.
- If leave is used for two consecutive workdays, an employer may request reasonable documentation to verify the need for leave.
- Employers are required to notify employees of their sick and safe leave rights. DLLR to provide model notice for employee handbook and poster.
- Employers must keep records of earned and used for three years.
- Employers may not retaliate against an employee who accesses their rights under the proposed law. Employees would have the right to file a lawsuit against their employer for violations of the proposed law.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Clippinger and many others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB1454
Title: Labor and Employment - Organ Donation Leave - Unfavorable
Abstract:
This bill entitles eligible employees to receive paid organ donation leave for up to 30 business days in any 12-month period to serve as an organ donor; and up to 7 business days in any 12-month period to serve as a bone marrow donor. An employer is defined as an employer of at least 15 individuals within the state of Maryland. An eligible employee is defined as an individual who has requested organ donation leave that will begin after having been employed by the employer for at least a 90-day period. Further, to be eligible for organ donation leave, the employee shall provide written physician verification that the employee is an organ or a bone marrow donor including verification of the medical necessity for the donation. If an employer provides paid leave to an eligible employee, it may require substitution of up to 14 days of paid leave for any part or all of the organ donation leave, and up to 5 days of paid leave for any part or all of the organ donation leave. The bill stipulates that organ donation leave may not be taken concurrently with any leave taken under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act. Qualified organ donation leave shall not be considered to be a break in the eligible employee’s continuous service for the purpose of salary adjustments, sick leave, vacation, paid time off, annual leave or seniority. The employer shall maintain group health coverage for the duration of the organ donation leave and in the same manner as if the eligible employee had remained continuously employed. Upon return to work after organ donation leave, an eligible employee is entitled to return to the position previously held when the organ donation began; or to an equivalent position with equivalent benefits, pay and terms and conditions of employment. Commissioned eligible employees shall continue to receive any commission that became due because of work performed prior to the organ donation leave. The bill would be administered by the Commissioner of Labor and Industry which may authorize investigations regarding whether provisions have been violated. The bill may not be interpreted to supersede compliance with a collective bargaining agreement or employer benefit program that provides greater organ donation leave rights to employees than those established by this bill. The bill also specifies remedies for violations of its provisions.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegates Lam, Moon, Ebersole, Morhaim and Platt
If passed, effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB1378
Title: Maryland Small Business Retirement Savings Program and Trust - SB1007 Passed in the Senate, favorable report by House Economic Matters; HB1378 passed in the House, and was re-referred to Senate Budget and Taxation
Abstract:
This Bill, if enacted, would establish the Maryland Small Business Retirement Savings Program and require participation by employers with ten (10) or more employees. It would provide a retirement savings program administered by a state-appointed Maryland Small Business Retirement Savings Board to private sector employees working at least 30 hours per week for a qualified employer. Employers would not be considered as fiduciaries of the program but would be required to make payroll deductions in the amount of 3% of an eligible employee’s wages and remit these to the Program, unless the employee chooses to opt out. Employers would retain the option to maintain any type of employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a defined benefit plan or 401(k) plan instead of participating in the Maryland Small Business Retirement Savings Program.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegates Frick and Waldstreicher
If passed, Effective: 07/01/2016

 

Wage and Hour Related Bills

Number: SB940
Title: SB940 Cross filed with HB820; HB1372 Cross filed with SB940 - HB1372 - Unfavorable report; SB940 did not move forward in the Senate
This bill proposes to increase the minimum wage rate as follows:

$10.10 on July 1, 2016 (rather than to $8.75 as is the current law);
$11.90 on July 1, 2017;
$13.25 on July 1, 2018;
$14.25 on July 1, 2019; and
$15.00 on July 1, 2020.

The bill contains a formula based on the Consumer Price Index, which would call for increases in the minimum wage annually. The bill would also repeal an employer’s use of the tip credit.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senator Madaleno and others
If Passed, Effective: 06/01/2016

Number: HB872
Title: Maryland Wage Payment and Collection Law – Awards of Certain Fees and Costs and Prohibition Against Retaliation - Unfavorable
Abstract:
This bill proposes to provide recovery of attorney’s fees for the Office of the Attorney General for bringing a lawsuit on behalf of an employee for violations of the Maryland Wage Payment and Collection Law (“MWPCL”). The bill also would prohibit an employer from retaliating against an employee for making a complaints or filing a lawsuit against an employer for a violation of the MWPCL.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Smith and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016


Number: HB420
Title: Labor and Employment - Minimum Wage - Individuals With Disabilities - SB417 Passed in the Senate and House; HB420 Passed in the House and Senate
Abstract:
This bill provides that a work activities center or other sheltered workshop that pays an employee with a disability less than minimum wage may not receive State funds.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Delegate Waldstreicher and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

 

Number: HB1442
Title: Payment of Wages - Use of Debit Cards and Card Accounts - Regulations - Withdrawn
Abstract:
This bill authorizes the Commissioner of Labor and Industry to adopt regulations to govern the credit of wages of employees to debit cards and card accounts under a specified provision of law.
In addition the bill states that each employer including a governmental unit:
-shall set regular pay periods; pay each employee at least once in every 2 weeks or twice in each month, but may pay an administrative, executive, or professional employee less frequently.
-shall pay the employee on the preceding workday, if the regular payday of an employee is a nonworkday.
-shall pay a wage in United States currency by a check that, on demand, is convertible at face value into US currency.
-may not print or cause to be printed an employee’s Social Security number on the employee’s wage payment check, an attachment to an employee’s wage payment check, a notice of direct deposit of an employee’s wage, or a notice of credit of an employee’s wage to a debit card or card account.
The bill does not prohibit the direct deposit of the wage of an employee into a personal bank account of the employee in accordance with an authorization of the employee; or credit of the wage of an employee to a debit card or card account from which the employee is able to access the funds through withdrawal, purchase, or transfer if: authorized by the employee; and any fees applicable to the debit card or card account are disclosed to the employee in writing in at least 12 point font.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senator Waldstreicher
If passed, Effective: 10/01/2016


Housing Anti-Discrimination and Public Accommodation Bills

Number: SB24
Title: Discrimination in Housing - Military Status - Unfavorable
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal Note and Policy Analysis, Click here.
This bill elevates “military status” to a protected class for purposes of State fair housing laws. "Military status" is defined as an active duty member of the armed forces, or a veteran with a specified discharge from the armed forces of the United States; etc. The bill would prohibit specified discriminatory acts relating to the sale or rental of a dwelling because of a person's military status. It would prohibit a person from discriminating in residential real estate-related transactions because of a person's military status. It would also prohibit a person from discriminating against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of the sale or rental of a dwelling because of military status.
Status: In the Senate - Unfavorable Report by Judicial Proceedings Committee.
Sponsor: Senator Simonaire
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: HB106
Title: Discrimination in Housing - Reentry Into Society Status - Unfavorable
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal Note and Policy Analysis, Click here.
This bill elevates “reentry-into-society status” to a protected class for purposes of State fair housing laws. “Reentry-into-society status” means the state of having completed a court-ordered sentence of imprisonment.
The bill would prohibit a person from refusing to sell or rent a dwelling to any person because of reentry-into-society status. It would also prohibit a person from discriminating against any person in the terms, conditions, or privileges of the sale or rental of a dwelling because of reentry-into-society status; etc. To
Status: In the House - Unfavorable Report by Environment and Transportation Committee.
Sponsor: Delegate Fennell and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016

Number: SB223
Title: Discrimination by a Place of Public Accommodation - Enforcement and Remedies - Unfavorable
Abstract: To Review the Fiscal Note and Policy Analysis Click here.
This bill establishes a process by which a respondent, a complainant, or the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights (MCCR) may elect to have the claims asserted in a complaint alleging discrimination by a place of public accommodation determined in a civil action. The bill also expands the remedies available for specific discrimination. It also clarifies the remedies available for an unlawful employment practice, and authorizes a complainant alleging specified discrimination to bring a civil action under specified circumstances.
Status: Pending
Sponsor: Senator Lee and others
If Passed, Effective: 10/01/2016
 

 



2015 Legislative Updates


House Bill 345 – Flexible Leave: Use of Leave for Family Illness.
Makes any agreement between employer and employee void if the agreement waives employee's right to use flexible leave for illness of the employee's immediate family. Prohibits employer from discharging, demoting, suspending, disciplining or discriminating against an employee or threatening to take any of these actions against an employee because the employee requested flexible leave.

Status: In the House - Hearing 2/27 at 1:00 p.m.
Bill Sponsor: Delegate Lierman
CHRA Commentary:
The Maryland Chamber of Commerce does not support this bill.

House Bill 478 – Discrimination Based on Use of Tobacco Products.
Prohibits employers from discriminating in any manner or taking adverse action against an employee or an applicant using tobacco products off the employer's premises during nonworking hours. Allows employees and applicants to submit complaint to Commissioner of Labor and Industry and authorizes the Commissioner to investigate whether a specified provision of the Act has been violated.

Status: In the House - Hearing 3/03 at 1:00 p.m. (Economic Matters)
Bill Sponsor: Delegate McDonough
CHRA Commentary:
This could open the door for more employment litigation. We note that the law applies to job applicants as well as employees. Many healthcare facilities already practice only hiring non-smokers. Even more organizations have a different health care premium for smokers.

House Bill 528 – Wage Records, Wages, and Payday Requirements.
Requires employers to keep wage records for each pay period for at least three years. Expands the types of wage records that employers are required to keep for each pay period. Requires employers to give employees written notice of information contained in this bill, as well as explanation of how wages are calculated within 10 days of hiring.

Status: In the House - Hearing 2/24 at 1:00 p.m.
Bill Sponsor: Delegate Lierman
CHRA Commentary:
Regulations are already in place regarding payroll records and other employment records regarding wages. This bill is extremely regimented and gives employees the right to file suit against the employer if the information is not kept according to the bill. Employers also would be regulated to provide a written explanation of how their wages are calculated. Most payroll systems do this already. Added burden makes no sense.

Senate Bill 424 (Cross filed with HB 1051) - Equal Pay for Equal Work.
Prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity in equal pay for equal work. Prohibits employer from discriminating between employees in any occupation by providing less favorable employment opportunities based on sex or gender identity; prohibits taking any adverse action against an employee concerning the disclosure or discussion of an employee's wages; etc.

Status: In the Senate - Hearing 3/05 at 1:00 p.m.
Bill Sponsor: S
enator Lee

Senate Bill 425 – Wage Disclosure and Discussion Protection.
Cannot take adverse employment action against an employee regarding disclosure or discussion of an employee's wages; authorizing an employer, in a specified policy, to establish specified limitations on specified inquiries about or discussions or disclosures of wages; providing that, under specified circumstances, the failure of an employee to adhere to specified limitations shall be an affirmative defense against specified claims; etc.

Status: In the Senate - Hearing 3/05 at 1:00 p.m.
Bill Sponsor: Senator Lee

House Bill 946 - Noncompete and Conflict of Interest Clauses.
Would make all non-competes and conflict of interest agreements void and against public policy.

Status: In the House, Hearing before Economic Matters Committee, 3/10 at 1pm
Bill Sponsor: Hornbe
rger

House Bill 985 – Establishment of Family and Medical Leave Insurance Program.
This would create a state-funded paid leave program.


Status: In the House, Hearing before Economic Matters Committee, 3/10 at 1pm
Bill Sponsor: Kelly


House Bill 1027 – Overwork Prohibition Act.
This would require an employer to pay overtime if an employee works more than 8 hours or works more than 7 consecutive days. This would also allow an employee to refuse overtime.

Status: In the House, Hearing before Economic Matters Committee, 3/10 at 1pm
Bill Sponsor: Glenn; A. Miller; B. Barnes, et al.
CHRA Commentary:
This would significantly change the wage and hour landscape in Maryland. We anticipate that the fiscal note will show that this would have a meaningful impact on Maryland businesses.

House Bill 1066 – Prohibition of Non-Disclosure Agreements.
Would prohibit specified employers from requiring employees from entering into non-disclosure agreements.

Status: In the House, Hearing before Economic Matters Committee, 3/10 at 1pm
Bill Sponsor: Hornbe
rger

Senate Bill 687 – (Cross-filed with: HB0776) State Personnel Parental Leave.
State employees may be entitled to parental leave with pay; establishes a maximum of 30 days of parental leave that employees may use for the care and nurturing of a child following the birth or adoption of the child.

Status: In the Senate - Hearing 3/19 at 1:00 p.m.
Bill Sponsor: Senator Benson

Senate Bill 688 – (Cross-filed with: HB0969) Fair Scheduling Act
Requiring an employer to provide notification to employees any changes in scheduling within 24 hours after making a change to the initial schedule; requiring an employer to post at each work site specified work schedules; requiring an employer to pay predictability pay under specified circumstances; etc.

Status

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